DS 537: Pittering Into Perpetuosity

T-1000 robot from Terminator 2: Judgment Day

Not content to call it quits at the midpoint last week, the guys decided to review the rest of Seed (or what was there at the time of recording, big doins in the newest update already!). Make Turry happy and listen to our thoughts so we all get out of this relatively unscathed. Please?

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Homestuck Returns!

It seems like only yesterday we were revisiting Andrew Hussie’s epic webcomic Homestuck when we looked at comics which have returned after long hiatuses. And as though our thoughts and words manifested into the ether, this week saw the return of none other than the internet’s most famous flash-based semi-interactive webcomic.

It’s time to choose… between meat and candy.

Andrew, you’ve Hussied us again! (Homestuck Epilogues landing page)

Homestuck’s latest update features an ‘epilogue’ to the story of John, Rose, Jade, Dave—and of course, Lord English—and much of the rest of the extended cast that grew with the comic across its nine-year run (although I guess that period technically needs to be updated now, huh?). It is, in true Homestuck style, a little confusing at first (especially if you accidentally skip the prologue and go straight to the main course/dessert as I did) and a little twisted at the end: but fans of the series will be rewarded by sticking through a read of both divergent (but intertwining) canon and non-canon paths.

I won’t spoil too much about what happens at the end, but… suffice it to say I wouldn’t be surprised if we were back here in another few years with a blog post entitled ‘Homestuck: the webcomic that keeps coming back’. Want to know why? Then why are you still here? Go read it now! 😀

Are you a fan of Homestuck? Let us know what you thought of its triumphant return in the comments below—and don’t forget to remind us that Hussie teased as much back in 2016 by catching us on Twitter and Facebook. And until next time, always remember: don’t eat the clickbait!

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DS 536: Frightening Future Fun for Fatties

Jason wasn’t fair to Dave Mercier and hop.dude, so he offers his apology along with a promise to read more and give his thoughts. He also noted to The Last Halloween creator Abby Howard how uncomfortable a recent update made him (which she appreciated). Finally, the guys take a look at Said Polat’s Seed, a comic about the problems that come with superintelligent AI that escape their confines and harass good, decent folk like you and me.

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Sex and Succubi and Webcomics

Don’t click away! It’s not the title of a Jane Austen novel you’ve never heard of (well, I guess it could be if ‘Pride and Prejudice and Zombies’ is a real thing…). This week, we’re continuing our dive into all things Webcomic Demonic by moving on from Love Advice from the Great Duke of Hell to look another way demons can work their way into the hearts of their comic’s protagonists—the more, erm… direct approach.

My Succubus Girlfriend #2, by R. Merryweather and Yoshitaka Maki
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DS 535: The Second-To-Last William

Sometimes, you just wanna curl up with a good story about a boy who is also a chosen one. And that’s what (we think) we have here, with a look at the first two-ish chapters of Brian Shearer’s William the Last. Read up, we’ll probably return to this one sooner than later.

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The Art of the (Faustian) Deal

Dating can be hard. Getting noticed, making a good first impression – this is why you need a great wingman!

Oh, wait – no wings. Send him back.
(Love Advice from the Great Duke of Hell by Unfins [Damien], episode 3)

Of course, if you’re wanting to secure a happily-ever-after with the love of your life, then perhaps calling upon one of the Great 23 Dukes of Hell, ruler over 30 legions of bloodthirsty demons who could descend in fury upon the cities of the world and reduce them to ash at the mere blinking of an eye… might not be your best option. Some (including Astaroth, the Great Duke himself) might say the idea is patently ludicrous. But Paul, the protagonist of Love Advice from the Great Duke of Hell by Unfins (Damien) isn’t alone in the annals of people selling their souls for ill-conceived reward. In fact, Paul’s Faustian deal is remarkably similar to the one made by the famous Faust himself – and the others that came before them who also sold their immortal souls for… just the silliest reasons.

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DS 534: Burns So Good

Montgomery Burns from The Simpsons lies sick in the hospital, attended by his manservant, Smithers

Webcomics live so long as we, the fans (and erstwhile creators) share them with others and grow the community. To that end, Jason showed someone Hop Dude and they … appreciated it? And now he has a new one to share with The Square Comics, home of the sick burn and … well, not much else. But it does that one thing really, really, scorchingly well.

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DS 533: Surprise! Love, The Internet

Mario is being mean to Yoshi

In celebration of Mar10 (Mario Day!), we took a look at the Mario-like hop.dude by Dave Mercier. It’s … weird, and subversive, with characters you know and love from the world of Nintendo, but who you’ve never actually truly met. There’s no real way to describe this comic, so go view it on Instagram and judge for yourself.

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DS 532: Running To The Firelight

We’re always on the lookout for our next favorite webcomic, so we took a look at a couple new ones in service to that end. Read along with us on the early pages of The Firelight Isle and Kamikaze, and see if they become your new favorites.

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Why 4-Panel Comics Aren’t Always Dominating Your Screens

Last week, a great article by Peter Rubin popped up on Wired.com: Why 4-Panel Comics Now Dominate Our Screens. In this examination of ‘What makes a webcomic go viral’, Rubin posits that:

Four-panel strips have been a fixture since early 20th-century newspaper comics like Mutt and Jeff and the concomitant appearance of yonkoma (“four-cell”) manga in Japan. It’s the perfect three-act-structure: You start at one end, develop conflict in the middle two panels, and resolve with a punch line at the end. But thanks to a number of factors—not least of which is the rise of Instagram and Reddit—a gridded, two-by-two variant has come to dominate the internet.

Peter Rubin, wired.com

Whilst Rubin’s article is clearly well-researched and definitely bags the incredible and recent cultural phenomenon which has been the Aliens from Nathan W. Pyle’s Strange Planet (the erstwhile E.T’s were originally planned to feature in this week’s blog post themselves!), I keenly felt Rubin’s omission of the greatest rival to this ‘dominant’ form: The Infinite Canvas.

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