Where do you read your Webcomics?

Webtoon. Tapas. Comic Rocket. Comic Chameleon. Twitter. Facebook. Or for we old-timers on the Webcomics scene, the good ol’ .com. There’s so many ways and places to read webcomics these days, it gets hard to keep up.

But for the last couple of months, I’ve been noticing something new. Something cropping up in the place I least expected it…

Something that’s… Explosm-ing my mind!

Explosm Entertainment, the parent name under which the flagship webcomic, Cyanide and Happiness and all its ancillary projects are produced by Rob DenBleyker, Kris Wilson, and Dave McElfatrick, is a veteran powerhouse of the Webcomics scene. Even if you’ve never visited the site, chances are you’ve seen one of its strips with its trademark stick-figure style and crude, dark humour shared around social media somewhere.

Cyanide and Happiness strip for 19 Jan 2019 (Dave McElfatrick)

In fact, you might have even caught one of their other big projects: the animated shorts they’ve been producing on their YouTube channel since as early as 2010.

Well, now it seems you can do both at once!

For the past few months, the Explosm YouTube Channel has been running a series of old strips alongside the regular video, blog, and other content on their ‘community’ page. And honestly, scrolling through YouTube was not the first (or last) place I thought I’d be stumbling across a webcomic reading experience!

With Webcomics—especially the powerhouses—diversifying more and more across multimedia, this seems like an interesting approach. Certainly, when you’re as prolific as Cyanide and Happiness, re-running those old strips can only be a win (who remembers a single strip from seven years ago out of the 5,000+ they’ve got posted?) and although a surprise, it was, at least for me, a welcome one!

At the moment it looks like you have to be a subscriber to their channel to see the comic posts popping up on your general feed, but with many other webcomic artists hosting their own animation or how-to videos on YouTube (and thus, having their own subscribers), I wonder if this is a model that might catch on?

What do you think? Would you be keen to get your webcomics fix on YouTube? Where’s the weirdest place you’ve seen a webcomic posted? Let us know in the comments below, or reach out to us on Facebook and Twitter – we’d love to hear what you think!

And as always, until next time – remember: don’t eat the clickbait!

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