DS 572: Life After Death Sucks

The promise of the afterlife is just too enticing, so we’re dying and coming back to life with Don Juan Mancha III’s Purgatory. But just what is going on in this life after life? Is it worth living in again? And why do we still have to go to work?

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DS 571: The Three Best Friends That Anyone Could Have

For this brave new decade, we’re looking at a comic we all wish was real life: living that role-playing life as our real life. Three brave(?) souls do just that in Myisha Haynes’ The Substitutes. Jason found it to be a little confusing but Steve is confident he’s just a moron. Have a listen to their thoughts and then give it a look to judge for yourself!

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DS 570: Credit Where It’s Due

After we give credit where it’s due for Everblue (check out the review in Episode 568), it’s time to jump in the Wayback Machine and travel back to 2011, when Magnolia Porter Siddell was just starting out on a little creature comic called Monster Pulse. We’re back, eight years later, to check in on Bina, Ayo, and the whole gang to see who’s still around and what monsters they have to check out. Join us!

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DS 569: You Never Go Full Anime Face

Families are the worst, right? And we’re not even talking about the holidays, but what about when your brother or lazy teenage son lets a sexy bird lady escape from your family’s private garden with the golden apple that holds an antidote which would end your family’s long reigning fortune? Yeah, that just SUCKS. If you’ve never experienced that yourself, enjoy our thoughts on The Red King, a comic so full of family drama and angst the bird women leap off the page and fly into your heart.

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DS 568: Be The Tomb Raider You Want To See In The World

We don’t do news items that often any more, but John Allison updates are worthy of our attention! After we get excited about Wicked Things, his upcoming expansion of the Scarymachinerydaysiverse, we take to the skies and give love a chance with the hopeful comic, Michael Sexton’s Everblue. Once you see the progress this story and artwork have made in the last decade, you’ll agree that it’s a must-read comic.

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DS 567: Ponch With The Pooch

Is it a journal comic? Is it a memoir comic? It doesn’t matter, because Ryan Made Mistakes is yet another good, good Ryan Estrada comic. Delve into Ryan’s sordid past with tales about school shower apprehension and melting clothes, it’s all there, laid bare, for you and I to consume and judge. BONUS: Given the subject matter of the comic, we included a small taste of our other show, Today I Learned Nothing, as Jason recounts his own problems with showing off his bits at school.

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DS 566: Native Naive Nativity

Welcome to Zero Game, where you can earn a second chance at living the life you lost or wasted, but must sit through unbelievable video game conceits and unnecessary exposition to earn it. Also, in the course of detailing the story of this comic, Steve reminds Jason of the lore behind the vehicular combat game franchise, Twisted Metal, and he is not happy about it.

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DS 565: Buckle Up, Kid

Are you ready to laugh? Like, seriously LAUGH? Then click through to Neil Kohney’s The Other End and let the guffaws begin! His comic, which mostly uses children to give hilarious commentary on everything in our modern society, has biting wit and dark comedy that should have you laughing with each click. If not, you’re a robot, and we request that you answer this CAPTCHA to proceed.

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DS 564: Threading the Dawn

We’re calling back to days of yore with a Horizons Watch-esque episode! Hear our thoughts on the short but excellent comics Threader by Liz Kramer and The Wrath and the Dawn by Renee Ahdieh and Silvester Vitale. Check them both out!

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DS 563: By Crom! It’s Tom, Never Thom

Motion comics can be stiff reading experiences, but what happens when they pay homage to a cartoon era that was likewise simple and stilted? Cyko KO! takes a swing at that question with a Webtoons, online-only comic that has plenty of fun hijinx but might be lacking in heart and depth. Listen to our thoughts, turn down your volume, and give the comic a look for yourself.

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