An App(arition) for Modern Horror

Happy… *checks calendar* What? November?! When did this happen?

Oh, right – I’ve been lost in the all-consuming vortex which is Tales of the Unusual by Seongdae Oh.

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DS 516: Seven Inches of Sass and Fire

Stan Lee Excelsior Funko Pop figureWebtoon continues to grow and now it’s getting some heavy hitting names like Stan Lee and Warren Ellis on the service. Also, we look at a comic that is charming, fun, and adventurous in 7″ Kara by Becca Hillburn.

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[Edit: OMG! This is my first top comment! Ty, Ty (UwU)] The Psychology Behind a Webtoons Phenomenon

If you’ve been following the podcast’s recommendations over the past few years, then odds are you’ve ended up somewhere on Line Webtoon once or twice.

Webtoons offer a great reading experience for webcomics: posting multiple pages for each chapter means you can blitz through really meaty chunks of a comic each update, and the way the posts flow into one another (particularly on mobile devices) leads to a real sense of ‘just-one-more’ishness equalled only by a packet of crisps or free booze at a work Christmas party.

Many regrets were had. Photo credit: istolethetv

But as you’re scrolling to the bottom, waiting for that little arrow to bump and tick you over into the next strip, you go past the comments. And inevitably, you see some variant of the following:

Witty comment pertaining to the latest update. (Edit: OMG! This is my first top comment you guys! Thank you, thank you, please remember that [cartoonist] is the real hero here, please like and support their work. Who thought this little thing I dashed off with barely any thought would be so popular haha I love you alllllllllllllll)”

The psychology behind commenting on the internet has been subject to a number of investigations, articles and academic papers over the years – but it seemed to me that this phenomenon was a little different to the standard trolling or ‘First!’ comments that plague other creative platforms like YouTube. So why do people feel the need to edit their comments once the original achieves some popularity? Continue reading

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Danielle Corsetto and Monica Gallagher launch a new Webcomic

Greetings, Digital Strippers*!

Most of you who’ve been listening to the podcast or reading through the blog over the past few years will be familiar with the love and respect the show has for Danielle Corsetto’s Girls With Slingshots and Stuck at 32. And if you’ve stumbled down the Webtoons rabbit hole once or twice, chances are you’ll have come across Monica Gallagher’s Assassin RoommateYou might also be familiar with Monica’s work as an Indy artist/creator on Bonnie & Collide, Nine to Five or her slew of other comic projects.

Today, these two creators of comics about strong, independent women came together (with colourist Mae. S. Keller) to launch their new collaborative comic: Boo! It’s Sex.

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Worth 1000 words…

We’ve spent the past month looking at words – podcasting webcomics is, after all, dependant on the hosts or interviewees talking (or else is dull listening, indeed).

My experimental podcast series “Enemy Mime” never got off the ground for some reason…
Image credit: Bandita

But webcomics are a vast and descriptive medium that doesn’t, itself, always rely on those words. We’re talking, of course, about the pantomime comic, and how they speak to us simply and effectively through their art – not their dialogue.

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